Garterlac Baby Blanket

I love entrelac.  One of my first posts on this humble little blog was all about my love for this technique. It may SEEM daunting, challenging even, but oh, it’s not. The small squares knit up fairly quickly making it a very satisfying technique because you feel like you’re making quick progress. Long story short, entrelac is fun. Give it a try.

A number of months ago, I was lurking on the Ravelry forums, and I added my two cents* regarding making a ‘garterlac’ baby blanket.  I put my needles to work with making such a blanket in early 2015. I didn’t really re-invent any wheels when I improvised this project, but someone encouraged me to write the pattern out, so here is my pattern.  Please note, it has NOT been test knit or edited or anything else fancy. These are my ramblings of a pattern I ad-libbed two years ago.

Credit must be passed along to Criminy Jickets as I followed his basic garterlac construction from his Garterlac Dishcloth, a wonderful intro to the Entrelac technique, and one can never have too many dishcloths. When I’ve used the wording from the Garterlac Dishcloth, it is denoted with the text in italics.

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Materials
Bernat Baby Blanket, 10 skeins (or 800m of super bulky yarn)
Size 9mm needles (US 13) – I used a circular needle of 80cm because the blanket gets BIG

Finished measurements
(approx): 4’ x 3’

Construction
The construction of this blanket consists of:

(1) Bottom row of triangles (blue yarn)
(2) Row of two side triangles and nine middle squares (white yarn)
(3) Row of 10 squares (blue yarn)
(4) Top row of triangles (blue yarn)

And in between (1) and (4) is a varying number of (2) and (3) repeated, ending with a (2)

 

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On my example, photo above, I repeated row (2) SEVEN times, and I repeated row (3) SIX times.

My example resulted in the cast on and cast off edges being the sides. Once you understand the basic construction of entrelac, you can adjust this structure for your purposes (i.e., if you cast on a smaller amount of stitches, you could work more rows (2) and (3) and essentially get a blanket with the same dimensions).

Each square is made with 8 stitches being worked.

Directions:
Cast on 80 stitches

Row (1)

Bottom Triangle:
K 1, turn, K 1, turn.
K 2, turn, K 2, turn.
K 3, turn, K 3, turn.
K 4, turn, K 4, turn.
K 5, turn, K 5, turn.
K 6, turn, K 6, turn.
K 7, turn, K 7, turn.
K 8, do not turn

Repeat the steps for ‘Bottom Triangle’ 9 more times (10 triangles created total). Turn.

Row (2)

Increasing Side Triangle:
K 1, turn, K-FB, turn.
K 1, SKP, turn, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 2, SKP, turn, K 1, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 3, SKP, turn, K 2, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 4, SKP, turn, K 3, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 5, SKP, turn, K 4, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 6, SKP, turn, K 5, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 7, SKP, do not turn.

You will now knit 9 squares

Square directions:
Pick up 8 stitches along the side of the previous row, turn. 
* K 8, turn, K 7, SKP, turn. *
Repeat between the *s another seven times, but do not turn at the end of the eighth repeat.

Decreasing Side Triangle:
Pick up 8 stitches along the side of the previous row, turn, K 8, turn.
K 6, K2tog, turn, K 7, turn.
K 5, K2tog, turn, K 6, turn.
K 4, K2tog, turn, K 5, turn.
K 3, K2tog, turn, K 4, turn.
K 2, K2tog, turn, K 3, turn.
K 1, K2tog, turn, K 2, turn.
K2tog, turn.

You are left with one stitch on the left hand needle.

Row (3)

Transfer the one stitch to the right-hand needle. Pick up a further 7 stitches down the side of the previous row so you have 8 stitches in total, turn, and continue with the directions for Square.  Make 10 squares.

Repeat Row (2) SEVEN times and Row (3) SIX times, or until you’ve reached your desired width, ending with a Row (2)

Row (4)

Top Triangle:
Pick up 7 stitches along the side of the previous row, turn.
K 6, K2tog, turn, K 6, SKP, turn.
K 5, K2tog, turn, K 5, SKP, turn.
K 4, K2tog, turn, K 4, SKP, turn.
K 3, K2tog, turn, K 3, SKP, turn.
K 2, K2tog, turn, K 2, SKP, turn.
K 1, K2tog, turn, K 1, SKP, turn.
K2tog, turn, SKP. K 1 and pass the second stitch on the right-hand needle over the first

Repeat the directions for Top Triangle 9 more times, until all stitches have been bound off.

Weave in ends.

Block if appropriate for the yarn.


*hmmm… we no longer have pennies in Canada that I could have contributed…. I added my five cent piece, then?

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Recently Finished Objects – A Bragging Post

Really, this post is simply to show off pretty yarns.

Earlier, I wrote about working on a baby blanket for a friend who is expecting.  I finished it well before my deadline of the shower, and I was very happy with the final project.  It is warm, soft, squishy, albeit a little heavy, but perfect to keep a baby boy all snuggled up.

Garterlac Baby Blanket, finished January 2015
Garterlac Baby Blanket, finished January 2015

On my needles since early December, I bought the yarn and pattern from one of my favourite local yarn shops, Soper Creek Yarn in beautiful downtown Bowmanville.  I worked on it on and off during those two months, and I finally finished it last Sunday!  The colours really make this simple shrug as lovely as it is.  I made it with James C. Brett Marble Chunky in the MC6 colourway.

Simple Shrug
Simple Shrug

I must have been in a big knitting mood that Sunday, because I also finished the yoga socks I was making for my boss!  I used the Paton’s Yoga Sock pattern, which had a lovely texture to it.  When she asked me to make them, I asked my boss what colour she would like them in, and as a response I received an “oh, you know…”  This was a very stressful answer!  Ultimately, when I saw the colours in Schachenmayr Regia North Pole Color, I knew the deep blues and purples would be perfect!  I’ll likely make this pattern again when I make myself a pair!

Yoga Socks
Yoga Socks

The final project I’ll share again has a tie to Soper Creek Yarn.  I bought the yarn to make the shrug during Bowmanville’s Moonlight Madness festival.  It’s one of my favourite local events to attend.  The town has its tree lighting, and the main street is closed to traffic allowing pedestrians and shoppers to leisurely enjoy the downtown, ideally with a hot drink in hand.  That evening, I was able to get a few Christmas gifts purchased while purchasing a few goodies for myself, like the yarn!  They had a raffle that evening, and I was able to put my name in the draw! Imagine my surprise when I received a call the following week, telling me that I won a door prize!  The prize was four balls of Schachenmayr original Merino Extrafine 85 and a pattern to make with the yarn!  I finished the Wrist Warmers in early January and they are soft and grey and they make me happy.

Cabled, cozy wrist warmers
Cabled, cozy wrist warmers

I’ve finally started my Midwinter Cardigan this weekend, how appropriate that I began this aptly named piece in the middle of Winter.  Will stay updated on the status of this piece I’ve been waiting to cast on for months now!