It’s a PineHatpple

The name my sister gave to this project. We’re both uber dorks.

A friend from the Museum Studies days was having a baby. This friend and I started working in the same city within a few months of each other, at different cultural organizations, and even after she moved on to a different opportunity in Toronto, we would still get together a few times a year for dinner, drinks, and to catch up.  She is notorious for her pineapple collection.  When I found out she was having a baby, how could I NOT knit her something pineapple related.

Here is the PineHatpple

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Finding the right pineapple hat on Ravelry wasn’t easy, and I ended up combining elements from two different patterns, following the lead of others who did the same thing.

The hat was made from the Pineapple hat pattern by Becky Veverkar. It was knit in the round with the wrong side facing you. As you knit the hat, the inside has the wonderful bobble-y texture taking form, and before you add the crown, you turn it inside out. The crown was made from pineapple tea cozy pattern, linked here. If it looks a little dodgy, don’t worry. Both the hat and crown patterns have been ‘archived.’  The yarn used was Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash.

Not long after the hat was sent to my friend, I got a lovely text back with her new daughter wearing the pineapple. I couldn’t have been happier with how it turned out and that I was able to make it for a good friend.

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Garterlac Baby Blanket

I love entrelac.  One of my first posts on this humble little blog was all about my love for this technique. It may SEEM daunting, challenging even, but oh, it’s not. The small squares knit up fairly quickly making it a very satisfying technique because you feel like you’re making quick progress. Long story short, entrelac is fun. Give it a try.

A number of months ago, I was lurking on the Ravelry forums, and I added my two cents* regarding making a ‘garterlac’ baby blanket.  I put my needles to work with making such a blanket in early 2015. I didn’t really re-invent any wheels when I improvised this project, but someone encouraged me to write the pattern out, so here is my pattern.  Please note, it has NOT been test knit or edited or anything else fancy. These are my ramblings of a pattern I ad-libbed two years ago.

Credit must be passed along to Criminy Jickets as I followed his basic garterlac construction from his Garterlac Dishcloth, a wonderful intro to the Entrelac technique, and one can never have too many dishcloths. When I’ve used the wording from the Garterlac Dishcloth, it is denoted with the text in italics.

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Materials
Bernat Baby Blanket, 10 skeins (or 800m of super bulky yarn)
Size 9mm needles (US 13) – I used a circular needle of 80cm because the blanket gets BIG

Finished measurements
(approx): 4’ x 3’

Construction
The construction of this blanket consists of:

(1) Bottom row of triangles (blue yarn)
(2) Row of two side triangles and nine middle squares (white yarn)
(3) Row of 10 squares (blue yarn)
(4) Top row of triangles (blue yarn)

And in between (1) and (4) is a varying number of (2) and (3) repeated, ending with a (2)

 

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On my example, photo above, I repeated row (2) SEVEN times, and I repeated row (3) SIX times.

My example resulted in the cast on and cast off edges being the sides. Once you understand the basic construction of entrelac, you can adjust this structure for your purposes (i.e., if you cast on a smaller amount of stitches, you could work more rows (2) and (3) and essentially get a blanket with the same dimensions).

Each square is made with 8 stitches being worked.

Directions:
Cast on 80 stitches

Row (1)

Bottom Triangle:
K 1, turn, K 1, turn.
K 2, turn, K 2, turn.
K 3, turn, K 3, turn.
K 4, turn, K 4, turn.
K 5, turn, K 5, turn.
K 6, turn, K 6, turn.
K 7, turn, K 7, turn.
K 8, do not turn

Repeat the steps for ‘Bottom Triangle’ 9 more times (10 triangles created total). Turn.

Row (2)

Increasing Side Triangle:
K 1, turn, K-FB, turn.
K 1, SKP, turn, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 2, SKP, turn, K 1, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 3, SKP, turn, K 2, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 4, SKP, turn, K 3, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 5, SKP, turn, K 4, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 6, SKP, turn, K 5, K-FB, K 1, turn.
K 7, SKP, do not turn.

You will now knit 9 squares

Square directions:
Pick up 8 stitches along the side of the previous row, turn. 
* K 8, turn, K 7, SKP, turn. *
Repeat between the *s another seven times, but do not turn at the end of the eighth repeat.

Decreasing Side Triangle:
Pick up 8 stitches along the side of the previous row, turn, K 8, turn.
K 6, K2tog, turn, K 7, turn.
K 5, K2tog, turn, K 6, turn.
K 4, K2tog, turn, K 5, turn.
K 3, K2tog, turn, K 4, turn.
K 2, K2tog, turn, K 3, turn.
K 1, K2tog, turn, K 2, turn.
K2tog, turn.

You are left with one stitch on the left hand needle.

Row (3)

Transfer the one stitch to the right-hand needle. Pick up a further 7 stitches down the side of the previous row so you have 8 stitches in total, turn, and continue with the directions for Square.  Make 10 squares.

Repeat Row (2) SEVEN times and Row (3) SIX times, or until you’ve reached your desired width, ending with a Row (2)

Row (4)

Top Triangle:
Pick up 7 stitches along the side of the previous row, turn.
K 6, K2tog, turn, K 6, SKP, turn.
K 5, K2tog, turn, K 5, SKP, turn.
K 4, K2tog, turn, K 4, SKP, turn.
K 3, K2tog, turn, K 3, SKP, turn.
K 2, K2tog, turn, K 2, SKP, turn.
K 1, K2tog, turn, K 1, SKP, turn.
K2tog, turn, SKP. K 1 and pass the second stitch on the right-hand needle over the first

Repeat the directions for Top Triangle 9 more times, until all stitches have been bound off.

Weave in ends.

Block if appropriate for the yarn.


*hmmm… we no longer have pennies in Canada that I could have contributed…. I added my five cent piece, then?

Bye, Baby Bunting

I met S. in university, our first day.  In our residence, our floor had 20 or so girls living on it, and on the first afternoon, we went around the circle and all introduced ourselves, where we’re from and what we were studying. It was an overwhelming day, with move in, saying goodbye to the fam, and meeting all of these new faces.

After a few short weeks, we got to know each other and we became friends.  This was almost 13 years ago.  After undergrad (where we spent many days studying, drinking coffees, talking about the important things you do in university, and many nights at various pubs, doing as most students do), she went on to graduate school, and I moved home and started working, returning to college a few short years later.  Even after all this time, S. is one of those people that I’m able to pick up with right away, as if no time has past, as if we just saw each other hours before in the Concourse.  I consider myself truly lucky to have such a great friendship with her, and to have such an easy yet lasting friendship.

S. got married in late 2013, and in early January 2016, a few of us Uni friends got together for brunch and S. shared her wonderful news, that she was expecting a baby! She’s not the first in our group of friends to have a baby, but she’s my closest of those friends, and she’s the first expectant friend since I’ve delved into the knitting addiction hobby. Once she told us the news, I started planning what I could make for her and her little one. Enter, the bunting bag.

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Diamond Bunting by Berroco; front (l) and back (r); the colour is more teal than is showing up in the picture!

I teased at this project a few weeks ago, but here it is, finished and ready for gifting. It is a Berroco pattern, made with Berroco Weekend DK (a wonderful acrylic/cotton blend). When I found the pattern on Ravelry, I fell in love with the intricate cables and textures of it. I must have cable amnesia for I must have forgot how cables and leaning stitches can perhaps become a little tedious after many, many row repeats. Tedious or not, I loved the finish product. The cables and leans are totally worth it for the end result, and S. loved the bunting bag, which more than anything, is the important part.