Finished Object Friday

I did it. I got through the short rows and finished my Pendant Purls Shawl earlier this week.

Happy Friday!

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Changing habits and accepting the compliment

I was perusing Pinterest a few weeks ago, as one does, and this meme caught my eye:

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Naturally, it made me laugh because of how accurate it is. I don’t know about you, but this is certainly a habit I’m guilty of. I’m not comfortable merely accepting the compliment with a simple thank you, but I always feel like I have to follow it up with something.

Person: Wow, those are great socks!
Me: Thanks, the yarn is self patterning. It makes it look fancier than it actually is.

Person: Wow, I love that shawl.
Me: Thank you, the yarn is ___________. The colour is lovely.

Person: I really like that hat.
Me: Thanks, the pattern is ___________, you should check it out.

Person: What a great sweater.
Me: Thanks, but I messed up here and here, and I would have done ________ differently.

These are fairly standard responses I know I have given in the past. Why do we do this? A knitted object can take anywhere from 20 minutes to 20 months (or more) to complete. Time is spent choosing the yarn, knitting the object, and finishing it to the specifications. A knitting object is truly a labour of love, and yet I will constantly downplay the work that I have put into it. I’m sure I’m not alone in this habit.  It’s time to change my attitude and accept the compliment. After all, I made the thing. I’m inwardly proud of the thing. Time to accept the love of the thing.

A Few Finished Objects

Last week, I wrote how I had a major case of start-itis – symptoms of which include being unable to stop casting on new projects, despite how many WIPs a person has on the go. This start-itis isn’t showing signs of being cured, having started three new projects last week.  Seriously, I can’t stop finding new patterns and going through my stash to see what I can use.

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The good thing about so many projects on the go is that I was able to finish three objects last week.  The first were these Cableship socks.  I started them in October as a knit-a-long by KnitPurl Hunter.  The first sock was finished early November, but this second one was put into hibernation until after Christmas knitting was complete.  In the week after Christmas, I struggled my way through Judy’s Magic Cast-on and a few weeks later, I was able to wear the newly finished pair of socks.

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Also finished was a slouchy hat for my dad. Fun story -the wool is 100% Peruvian Alpaca, and we ventured to a local Alpaca farm to by the yarn. My goodness, alpacas must be some of the freaking cutest animals around. When we arrived at the farm, we were greeted by a herd (is that right, herd?) of Border Collies who were obviously working dogs, and we also got a peak at their pigs. They had to be the fattest pigs I’ve ever seen in my life. So that’s the story of they yarn for this hat.  Dad received it yesterday. It fits and he’s happy.

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Finally, on Friday, I bought yarn and cast on a Pussyhat.  Have you heard of this? If not, I HIGHLY recommend heading over to their website and reading more about this movement. In a nutshell, there will be a women’s march on Washington on January 21, and marchers are encouraged to wear these knit hats, the name taken as both a play on on the word pussycat and as reference to how the US President-Elect brags about sexually assaulting women. As stated on their Ravelry page:

The PussyHat Project aims to:

  1. Provide the people of the Women’s March on Washington D.C. a means to make a unique collective visual statement which will help activists be better heard.
  2. Provide people who cannot physically be on the National Mall a way to represent them- selves and support women’s rights.

A Facebook friend of my sister’s asked for a hat to be made, and I happily obliged.  It knit up VERY quickly; I cast on Friday evening and by Sunday I had it finished and ready for my sister to give to the recipient.

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Please visit their website and read more about this initiative.

 

Tiny Ornaments

I have a tiny house. It’s tiny and perfect because it’s just me who lives in it, and I love it.  Last year was my first Christmas in the house, but I didn’t do much in terms of holiday decorating.  I had a wreath on the front door, I had some ornaments in a vase as a centrepiece on my coffee table, and I have a Santa Key, a decoration given to me by a cousin. It’s for houses that don’t have a chimney, a magical key that would let Santa in.  This year, I got myself a tiny Christmas tree for my tiny house.

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As this is my first Christmas tree on my own, I didn’t have any ornaments to decorate it. A trip to the dollar store fixed this problem, but some ribbon, a star, and bulbs add colour and festiveness, but they didn’t add much in terms of personality. So, I turned to Ravelry.

What else does a knitter need for her Christmas tree than some hand-knit ornaments.  A few hours and episodes of Full House later, and my tree is a little more yarny.

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I have lots of scraps of Cascade 220 and when I found Tiny Sweater, it seemed like a perfect use!

Searching for ornaments on Ravelry brings up over 3000 results (although not all of them are strictly tree ornaments), and another that caught my eye were these geek-inspired ornaments.  I think my tree needs a TARDIS and a cunning hat. ]

I know I’ll add more personality and my  own unique touches to my ornament collection as the years go on, but for now, I’m pretty happy with my first tiny tree for my tiny house.